Now Conductor Mark Peacock can #SeeTheMusic

Conductor-Mark-Peacock-in-Greenfield wears musicians glasses

It’s music to Marks eyes and ears

Coming from a large brass banding family, Mark Peacock MA, BA. (Hons), PGCE picked up the cornet at an early age. In his formative years, Mark played in the local Salvation Army band before moving onto flugelhorn and joining the Tyldesley Band. Mark first crossed paths with Allegro Optical Managing Director and professional conductor Stephen Tighe, in the early 1990s when he joined Bedford Leigh Band. Steve had been conducting the band since 1989 and he happily welcomed such a talented young player.  Mark went on to study music at Salford University. He became the first “brass bander” to graduate with a 1st class honours degree. Mark then returned in 2007 to complete his Masters. Whilst at university he was invited to join the newly formed Yorkshire Building Society Band, now Hammonds Saltaire Band. It was at this point that Steve and Mark went their separate ways, but certainly didn’t become strangers.  In 1996 Mark fulfilled his lifelong ambition and joined the ranks of the Fairey Band cornet section, enjoying a great deal of concert and contest successes.

A bright future

With such an excellent pedigree it is no surprise that Mark has had a very successful Head of Music / Head of Year / Head of Faculty in a Cheshire comprehensive school for 17 years. He is now a self-employed musician with Wigan Music Service, an examiner and an associate lecturer for Manchester Metropolitan University. Marks conducting career began in 2003, when he was appointed Music Director of the Pemberton Old Band. Here he had a string of successful concert and contest outings, the highlight of which was the bands’ victory in the 2004 1st Section National Championships, thereby returning the band to the championship section. Since then Mark has been the resident conductor of Wingates and The Fairey Band.  In 2010 Mark was asked to take The Longridge Band to the North West Area Contest and then on a more permanent basis. Mark has always been blessed with good vision and has always been able to read a conductor’s score with ease. However, Mark was becoming increasingly frustrated as he was struggling to focus on the music on his stand. He had tried reading glasses but these were only really any good for reading music from the lyre. Unable to find a satisfactory solution, Mark often enlarged the score to make it more comfortable. He realised that he needed to see the score and the band clearly. On the recommendation of  Bb Bass player Brian Law,  Mark came to visit us at Allegro Optical in Saddleworth.

Seeing the light

Our Optometrist and Flautist Amy Ogden, conducted a thorough eye examination and measured all Marks working distances. Amy found Mark is slightly myopic with bilateral  oblique astigmatism and he also requires a moderate reading addition. In short, Mark was experiencing the early symptoms of presbyopia.  Following his eye examination, Mark and Dispensing Optician Sheryl Doe worked together to create the perfect spectacles for Marks needs. He has so many specific working distances. So single-vision spectacles, bifocals or occupational lenses, were not a viable solution. A standard varifocal wasn’t really an answer either, as he needs such a wide field of view. Mark has to be able to scan a large conductors score while still being able to see all the musicians he is conducting. Usually about 30 people. Conductors’ scores are usually 60cm wide by 21cm high and on a stand which often Mark varies the height. This changes according to the ensemble he is working with and the type of music being played. Mark needs to be able to see every musician’s part clearly so any area of distortion would be unacceptable.  Mark chose a lovely Evatik supra frame in blue. The choice of a supra frame works well for anyone in Mark’s profession, as the frame provides a clear view right to the bottom of the lens, with no distracting bottom rim. Sheryl extended the depth of the lenses to give Mark a much deeper field of view that enables him to see the score on the conductor’s stand, no matter how low he has it set. Once they had chosen the frame Sheryl set about dispensing the lenses. She based Mark’s lens design on our Performers OV lens , but adapted it to provide Mark with clear distance vision as well as providing him with the best possible vision when working. The Performers OV lens provides musicians with a wide visual field and gives relaxed vision in this case up to 100 metres or more. 

Testing times

Mark collected his glasses quite a few weeks later as the Coronavirus lockdown caused quite a few delays. Like at many businesses, our surfacing and glazing lab had to place the majority of their staff on furlough. They have worked with a skeleton staff to fulfil orders while maintaining social distancing.  Never before have our lens lab colleagues had to reshape and adapt so quickly. To protect the team members who suddenly found themselves working under the most difficult and potentially hazardous circumstances. Operating with a minimal team, they were able to complete most orders, but it did take much longer than usual, but we are very grateful for their efforts. 

Seeing is believing

When he collected his glasses Mark commented on the improvement they made. He said; “I’m absolutely delighted with the glasses that Allegro Opticians prescribed for me. They fully understood my requirements and took great care and concern that my needs were met. As a conductor, having a clear view of both the music and ensemble, without any lack of clarity was impossible before, but now both key elements have been addressed. I cannot praise the service and help I received from Sheryl and her team. They are knowledgeable, approachable and understanding. A first class company who I recommend to any musician. Thank you so much!”

Why do musicians come to Allegro Optical?

As an independent family run business, we are gaining an international reputation for professional excellence and an inventive approach to meeting customer needs. Now known internationally as the ‘Musician’s Opticians’ we are attracting many clients from across Europe and further afield. Our groundbreaking work with performers, players and conductors has resulted in Allegro Optical becoming the first and only opticians to gain registration with the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM). We treat each client as an individual because they are. It is true that no two musicians are the same, so why should their vision correction be? We enjoy creating unique lenses to meet a musician’s particular needs. As musicians ourselves we can ask the right questions and interpret the answers accordingly.

Award-winning eye-care

We’ve been pretty successful in helping performers to #SeeTheMusic. In fact, in the last twelve months alone we have scooped no less than five national and regional awards for our work in this field. These awards include the National ‘Best New Arts & Entertainment Business of the Yearat a gala event in London. Managing Director Sheryl Doe was awarded the 2019Dispensing Optician of the Year and she was a finalist in the AOP Dispensing Optician of the year 2020.  Allegro Optical’s cutting edge approach to dispensing and their musical experience has led to the team being shortlisted for the prestigious Opticians Awards, Optical Assistant team of the year 2020 which again due to Coronavirus has been postponed During March 2019, Allegro Optical was awarded the ‘Scale-Up Business of the Year‘, at the regional finals of the Federation of Small Business awards in York. They then went on to receive the FSB Chairman’s award at the national finals in May. Finally winning the FBU Yorkshire family business of the year. Allegro Optical has been featured in many national publications including The Times, 4BarsRest, The British Bandsman and Music Teacher Magazine. If you are a musician who is struggling with their vision and making music no longer the enjoyable experience it once was, give us a call at either Greenfield on 01457 353100 or Meltham on 01484 907090.

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