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#SeeTheMusic and More – Glaucoma, the silent thief of sight

Eye conditions and the performing arts professional

Being the only performing arts eye care specialist in the UK as well as the only optician registered with BAPAM , we fully understand how issues with the eyes can negatively affect a performer’s career.

Musicians, dancers, singers, presenters, camera operators, sound engineers, and video technicians have all benefited from our assistance.

We all may experience vision problems at some point in our lives. Most of these problems are caused by refractive errors, which affect the way the eyes focus light, rather than an underlying condition or illness. Nevertheless, eye conditions affect many people. The purpose of this blog series is to examine common eye disorders experienced by performing arts professionals.

Glaucoma – What exactly is it?

The term “glaucoma” refers to a group of diseases that affect the optic nerve, which connects the retina to the brain, resulting in a loss of peripheral vision. Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma.

Of the multiple types of glaucoma, the two main types are open-angle and angle-closure glaucoma.

Variants of open-angle and angle-closure glaucoma include:

  • Secondary Glaucoma.
  • Pigmentary Glaucoma.
  • Pseudoexfoliative Glaucoma.
  • Traumatic Glaucoma.
  • Neovascular Glaucoma.
  • IridoCorneal Endothelial Syndrome (ICE)
  • Uveitic Glaucoma.

As glaucoma is asymptomatic, but causes irreversible vision loss, it has been referred to as the “silent thief of sight.”. According to the World Health Organisation, it’s a leading cause of irreversible blindness (World Health Organisation, 2010). (Bunce et al., 2010) cites it as the second most common cause of visual impairment registration in England and Wales. Glaucoma is an umbrella term for a large group of disorders with a wide variety of clinical and pathological characteristics. The common characteristics are: 

  • Optic nerve damage
  • Visual field loss

The disease is a silent progressive disease and, if detected and treated early, is preventable and can lead to significant visual impairment or blindness. Diagnosis is crucial, and adherence to treatment is essential to prevent vision loss.

Glaucoma accounts for the majority of the workload (1 million visits per year) in  UK eye clinics. About 2% of people over 40  years of age and nearly 10% of people over  75 have primary (chronic) open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Only about half are diagnosed (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, 2009). The social and economic burden of glaucoma-related vision loss and  workload is likely to increase due to longer life expectancy (Coleman and Miglior, 2008; Burr et al., 2007). Because glaucoma patients may  have no symptoms until they have lost their vision, then the loss of vision is irreversible. Once vision loss is apparent, 90% of the fibres of the optic nerve  may be irreparably damaged (NICE, 2009). Treatment slows progression by lowering intraocular pressure (IOP).

Consequences of glaucoma for the performer

Damage to nerve cells in the retina leads to damage to the visual field. Peripheral fields are usually damaged first. Loss of peripheral vision may go unnoticed until it reaches a significant level, due to the small role that peripheral vision plays in the overlapping vision of our eyes and in perceiving what most people can see. Deterioration usually progresses slowly over the years, although some types of secondary open-angle glaucoma can progress faster.

Performers, particularly musicians who play larger instruments such as pianos, organs and large percussion use their peripheral vision more than most. As a result the symptoms of peripheral vision loss may well be detected sooner. 

Some instrumentalists however may be at an increased risk of the condition. Recent studies suggest that musicians playing high-impedance wind instruments may be susceptible to glaucoma. This could be because the Valsalva manoeuvre is generated when blowing into a high impedance wind instrument. The Valsalva manoeuvre has been reported to cause high intraocular pressure (IOP). 

High and low resistance wind musicians experience a temporary increase in intraocular pressure while playing their instrument. The magnitude of the IOP increase is greater for high resistance players than for low resistance players. High-resistance wind musicians have a lower incidence of visual field loss than other musicians but IOPS are significantly higher, which is associated with lifetime playing time. The cumulative effects of long-term intermittent elevated IOP while playing high-resistance wind instruments could cause cell damage and possibly lead to an increased risk of developing glaucoma.

How do we check to see if you are at risk of glaucoma?

Tonometry

Our optometrists perform a number of different tests to look for glaucoma. We use a device called a tonometer to measure the pressure inside your eye. Our optometrist will put a small amount of anaesthetic and dye into the front of your eye. They will then shine a light into your eye and then use a tonometer to measure the pressure in your eye. Some optometrists use a different instrument that uses a puff of air called a non contact tonometer which does not touch the eye to check the pressure.

A visual field test determines whether any portions of vision are missing. It’s possible that you’ll be shown a series of light dots and asked to press a button to indicate which ones you saw. Some little dots may appear at the periphery of your vision (peripheral vision), which is generally the first area of glaucoma to be impacted. If you can’t see the spots you may be at risk of glaucoma.

Evaluation of the optic nerve 

Because the optic nerve, which connects your eye to your brain, can be damaged in glaucoma, an examination may be performed to determine its health.

Slit Lamp Exam

Eye Drops will be used to dilate your pupils for the test. Your eyes are then examined using a slit lamp (a microscope with a bright light) Slit-lamp examination of the optic nerve magnifies the view with hand-held lenses, allowing for greater control over the examination. This technique produces a stereoscopic, inverted image of the optic nerve.

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) tests create a topographical map of the optic nerve by taking cross-section pictures of the retina with non-invasive light waves. The thickness of the nerve fibre layer, which is the portion of the optic nerve most vulnerable to eye pressure elevation, is measured by an OCT test.

Referral to a specialist

If signs of glaucoma are detected during any of the tests, you will be referred to an ophthalmologist for further investigation. If you do have glaucoma the ophthalmologist will confirm your diagnosis and find out:

  • how far the condition has progressed
  • how much damage has been done to your eyes
  • what may have caused the condition

The ophthalmologist will be able to advise on treatment. 

In some cases, your ophthalmologist will continue to treat you. But for less serious types of glaucoma, you may be referred back to the opticians.

Treatment

There are a few courses of action to treat glaucoma, including eye drops, laser treatment and surgery. The best treatment for you will depend upon your condition.

Eye Drops

Treatment can’t reverse any vision loss but it starts with eye drops. These can help reduce IOP by improving drainage from your eye or by reducing how much fluid your eye makes. Depending  how low your eye pressure should be, more than one type of the eyedrops may be recommended.

Laser Treatment

Laser treatment might be suggested in the event that eye drops don’t work.

This is where a high-energy light is focused on part of your eye to stop or reduce fluid build up.

Sorts of laser treatment include:

laser trabeculoplasty

a laser is used to open up the vessels inside the eye,  to allow more fluid  to empty out and reduce the tension inside

cyclodiode laser treatment

a laser is utilised to remove a small amount of eye tissue that delivers the fluid, which can then decrease pressure in the eye

laser iridotomy

a laser is used to make openings in the iris to permit liquid to escape from your eye.

Surgery

In situations where eyedrops or laser treatments haven’t been successful surgery may be offered.

The most well-known sort of a medical procedure for glaucoma is called trabeculectomy. It includes removing part of the eye’s drainage mechanisms to permit more liquid to escape without any problem.

There are other glaucoma surgical options, including:

trabeculotomy — similar to a trabeculectomy, other than a tiny segment of the eye-drainage vessels are removed using an electric current.

A segment of the white outer covering of the eyeball (the sclera) is removed to allow fluid to drain more easily from the eye.

Deep sclerectomy — the drainage channels in the eye are enlarged, sometimes with the insertion of a small device.

trabecular stent bypass – a small catheter is inserted into your eye to improve fluid outflow.

Conclusion

Patients with chronic conditions, such as glaucoma, should work with their optometrist and other eye care professionals. Preventing irreversible and severe vision loss necessitates early detection and screening.

Getting regular eye exams is now the easiest approach to avoid major glaucoma damage.

Most people can keep their vision with early identification and meticulous, lifetime treatment. In general, a glaucoma check should be performed:

  • under age 40, every two years
  • from age 40 to age 64, every 12 months
  • after age 65, every six to 12 months

A screening should be done every year or two in those with high risk factors after 35. In addition to people of African descent and people with diabetes, those with a family history of glaucoma and wind instrumentalists have an elevated risk of getting glaucoma. If you have a parent or sibling with glaucoma, you are at higher risk.

Benefits of Exercise

A moderate exercise program is beneficial to your overall health, and studies have shown that moderate exercise, such as jogging or walking, three or more times a week, can lower IOP.

You can only reap the benefits of exercise for as long as you continue to exercise; this is why moderate exercise on a regular basis is recommended. The practice of yoga can be beneficial, but it’s important to avoid inverting positions, such as headstands and shoulder stands, as these can increase IOP.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding an exercise program, you should speak with your doctor.

Keep Your Eyes Protected

While participating in sports or doing home improvement projects, it is important to wear protective eyewear.

Protecting your eyes from injury is another way to prevent glaucoma. Traumatic glaucoma and secondary glaucoma are both caused by injury to the eyes.

The best defence against glaucoma and other eye diseases is a regular comprehensive eye exam.

In Summary

The optometrists at Allegro Optical have the technology, facilities, including our fantastic 3D OCT eye scanners, and experience to determine if your eye flashers are serious. Early detection and treatment are critical for preserving your vision, eye health, and performing arts career.

As the UK’s only specialist Performing Arts eye care provider we understand more than most just how much dry eye conditions can impact a performer’s career and everyday life. 

Our optical specialists understand the demands of professional musicians and performing arts professionals. Working in collaboration with our dispensing opticians and optometrists, we are able to assist musicians. It is surprising how many musicians are unaware of the many solutions available to them. 

With the precision of our performing arts eye exams, the expertise of our optometrists and dispensing opticians using cutting edge diagnostic equipment and dispensing procedures our unique approach can help to resolve performing arts practitioners’ vision problems. 

If you are suffering from any of the symptoms mentioned above or have any of the symptoms described then please speak to one of our staff.  To book an appointment or find out more about our exclusive dry eye programme, Call us today and speak to a member of our team. 

Contact: To find out more about Allegro Optical, the musicians’ opticians go to; https://allegrooptical.co.uk/services/musicians-optical-services/

Categories
Music

#SeeTheMusic and More -Floaters and Flashes, what are they and should you worry?

Eye conditions and the performing arts professional

Because we are the only performing arts eye care specialist in the UK and the only optician registered with BAPAM, we understand how eye conditions can negatively impact a performer’s career.

Performing arts professionals, such as musicians, dancers, singers, presenters, camera operators, sound engineers, and video technicians, have all benefited from our assistance to see the music.

We are all likely to encounter vision problems at some point in our lives. Most of these problems are caused by refractive errors, which affect the way the eyes focus light, rather than a condition or illness affecting the eye. Even so, many of us could be affected by eye conditions. In this series of blogs, we examine common eye conditions experienced by performing arts professionals.

Floaters – What are they?

In today’s blog we are looking at two common vision complaints, Floaters. When performing on stage under bright lights, floaters and flashes can be especially bothersome. Many of our clients comment that they see floaters, but what exactly is a floater? 

A “floater” is a small spot in your vision that is caused by tiny particles of collagen or protein that form in the jelly-like substance in the centre of the eye. When the jelly-like substance in the eyeball (known as the vitreous gel) changes, shrinks, or becomes more liquid, it causes eye flashes and floaters. The optometrist may sometimes refer to this as posterior vitreous detachment, and it is a regular occurrence as we become older (PVD).

When we see a floater, we are actually seeing the shadow cast on the retina, not the floater itself. As the vitreous diminishes, the gel-like substance becomes stringy, casting shadows on the retina and causing floaters to appear in our field of vision. The retina is a thin layer located at the back of the eye. This layer converts light energy into electrical signals, which are then transmitted to your brain and processed to produce the images we see (our vision).

Floaters come in a variety of shapes and sizes: some are light, others are dark, some are chunky, and still others are stringy. When we try to look at them directly, they appear to dart away from our field of vision. Floaters are more visible when viewed against a bright plain background and on their own are rarely something to worry about. Floaters are much more common than flashes. 

Floaters are common and, in most cases, pose little risk to our vision or eyesight. They usually do not require treatment, but they might occasionally be a symptom of retinal detachment, which is a more serious problem that necessitates medical attention. When the vitreous, which is shrinking, drags on the retina, drawing it away from the back of the eye and effectively tearing it, retinal detachment occurs. Because retinal detachment can permanently damage your vision, it is best to have your eyes checked as soon as possible rather than ignoring the problem and risking vision impairment.

Blurred vision, pain in your eye, a sudden increase in floaters or flashes, the sudden appearance of floaters or flashes, a decline in your central vision, or shading of vision are all signs of a more serious problem.

Why the flashes?

Flashing lights or lightning streaks may appear when the vitreous gel in our eyes pulls on the retina. After being hit in the eye or on the head, many people describe this sensation as seeing “stars.” These light flashes can happen on and off for weeks or months.

Eye flashes appear in our field of vision as dots or pinpricks of light. They come in a variety of shapes and sizes, some of which are wavy, others jagged, and still others which resemble shooting stars.

It is common to see brief flashes of light, and in many cases, there is no cause for alarm. We recommend that anyone experiencing frequent, persistent, or increasing occurrences of eye flashers see an optometrist as soon as possible.

Flashes can occur as a result of the following conditions:

  • Ageing – Causes the vitreous to shrink or change, resulting in flashes of light. The likelihood of seeing light flashes increases with age.
  • Pressure on the retina – Rubbing your eyes too hard or being struck in the eye can cause the vitreous to bump the retina, resulting in eye flashers.
  • Migraine – A migraine can cause vision problems. As part of a migraine, you may experience glinting lights, dots, sparkles, and flashes of light.

Is it a Serious Issue to Have Eye Flashes?

Given how important our vision is to us, it’s natural for us to wonder if our vision is in danger when we see a flash of light in our eye. While many cases of eye flashes are considered normal, they can also be the result of a serious retinal condition.

Tear or Detachment of the Retina

In rare cases, the vitreous can pull the retina so hard that it tears, causing it to peel from its position at the back of the eye. Flashers can be caused by a torn or detached retina.

The sudden onset of new eye flashers, persistent flashers, a floater shower, and flashes of light accompanied by blurry vision are all indications that an optometrist should be seen as soon as possible. To avoid blindness or partial vision loss, retinal surgery or other interventions may be required.

In Summary

The optometrists at Allegro Optical have the technology, facilities, including our fantastic 3D OCT eye scanners, and experience to determine if your eye flashers are serious. Early detection and treatment are critical for preserving your vision, eye health, and performing arts career.

As the UK’s only specialist Performing Arts eye care provider we understand more than most just how much dry eye conditions can impact a performer’s career and everyday life. 

Our optical specialists understand the demands of professional musicians and performing arts professionals. Working in collaboration with our dispensing opticians and optometrists, we are able to assist musicians. It is surprising how many musicians are unaware of the many solutions available to them. 

With the precision of our performing arts eye exams, the expertise of our optometrists and dispensing opticians using cutting edge diagnostic equipment and dispensing procedures our unique approach can help to resolve performing arts practitioners’ vision problems. 

If you are suffering from any of the symptoms mentioned above or have any of the symptoms described then please speak to one of our staff.  To book an appointment or find out more about our exclusive dry eye programme, Call us today and speak to a member of our team. 

Contact: To find out more about Allegro Optical, the musicians’ opticians go to; https://allegrooptical.co.uk/services/musicians-optical-services/

Categories
Music

#SeeTheMusic and More – Dry eye, it’s a blinking nuisance

Dry eye disorders and the performing arts professional

Being the UK’s only performing arts eye care specialists and the only optician registered with the British Association For Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM), we understand first-hand how eye disorders can negatively impact a career. 

Artists such as musicians, dancers, singers, presenters and technicians, including camera operators, sound engineers and Audio-visual technicians, are just some of the performing arts professionals we have assisted to see the music.

Almost all of us will experience vision problems at some point in our lives. Refractive errors are responsible for most of these problems, which means they affect the way the eyes focus light, rather than an eye disease or disorder. Nonetheless, many of us could be affected by eye disorders or diseases. In this blog series, we examine common eye conditions experienced by performing arts professionals. 

Here are the five most common eye disorders and diseases:

  • Cataracts are a widely occurring eye problem and usually affect people over the age of 65. Most have a visually impairing cataract in one or both eyes. Cataracts are usually seen as the formation of a dense, cloudy area in the lens of the eye. When this happens, light is simply unable to pass through to the retina and the victim is unable to clearly see objects in front of them.

  • Dry eye disease is a common condition that occurs when your tears aren’t able to provide adequate lubrication for your eyes. Some people may experience subtle, but constant, eye irritation to significant inflammation and even scarring of the front surface of the eye. 

In different parts of the world, dry eye syndrome affects anywhere from 5% to 50% of the population. Contact lens wearers are particularly susceptible to the condition. The condition is also common in the elderly.

  • Glaucoma causes damage to the eye’s optic nerve.  In most cases, this is due to fluid buildup and increased internal pressure. This interferes with the transmission of images from the optic nerve to the brain. If the buildup of pressure continues without treatment, it may lead to permanent loss of vision. 

Glaucoma progresses relatively quickly and can cause blindness within a few years. The most common symptoms of glaucoma include tunnel vision, peripheral vision loss, blurry eyes, halos around the eyes, and redness of the eyes.

  • Macular degeneration (AMD) is a condition affecting the central part of your view. It typically affects people in their 50s and 60s. The condition does not cause total blindness. Nevertheless, it can make everyday tasks difficult, such as reading and recognising faces.

Your vision may deteriorate without treatment. AMD can develop slowly over several years (“dry AMD”) or rapidly over a few weeks or months (“wet AMD”).

The exact cause of AMD is unknown. The risk factors include smoking, high blood pressure, being overweight, and having a family history of AMD.

  • Retinal Detachment is precisely what it sounds like. It is the detachment of the retina from its place within the eye. There may be small tears in the retina before the whole retina is detached. If it is left untreated, complete vision loss can occur in the affected eye. It sounds painful, but people rarely feel any pain during retinal detachment.

There are various warning signs that a retinal detachment may occur. These include blurred vision, a sudden appearance of light flashes, and a curtain-like shadow in one’s field of vision.

Dry Eye Disease: An overview

It will never be possible to completely cure Dry Eye, however, we can easily manage and its symptoms are treated and alleviated with a tailored treatment program.

What is Dry Eye?

Dry eyes are caused by either not producing enough tears or tears that are of poor quality or that evaporate far too quickly.  Tears are normally made to keep the surface of the eye moist and lubricated, so a lack of tears or a reduction in the quality can result in gritty, burning sensations in the eyes and also cause vision problems.

Symptoms of Dry Eye

The symptoms of Dry Eye may include:

  • Dryness
  • Burning, stinging or itching
  • Gritty feeling
  • Irritation from wind or smoke
  • Blurred or smeared vision
  • Tired eyes
  • Red eyes
  • Excessive watering
  • Photophobia (sensitivity to light)
  • Contact lens discomfort

Causes of Dry Eye?

  • Ageing
  • Allergies
  • Blepharitis (inflammation of the eyelids)
  • Dry environment and pollution
  • Computer use
  • Visual concentration,
  • Contact Lens wear
  • Hormonal changes, especially in women e.g. menopause
  • Dry Eye may also be symptomatic of general health problems or disease e.g. people with arthritis are more prone to Dry Eye (Sjogren’s Syndrome = arthritis + dry eye + dry mouth)
  • LASIK surgery
  • Preservatives
  • Certain types of medication – your optometrist or GP can advise you of any known links between medicine and Dry Eye.

Performing Arts Professionals and Dry Eye  Disorders

After a rehearsal or a concert, do your eyes become tired and irritated? After playing and reading the music for a while, does it start to look blurry? These are symptoms of dry eye. Having spoken to our clients and measuring their blink rate we have found that about  1/3 of them suffer from varying degrees of dry eye symptoms.

The bright stage lights and dry air found in most rehearsal rooms and orchestra pits, along with the almost constant staring at sheet music adds to the risk of developing dry eyes. Fortunately, there are simple steps you can take to ease its symptoms.

In most cases, dry eyes occur when your eyes do not make enough tears to keep them moist and to wash away dust. Environmental factors also contribute to dry eyes. Performing Arts and media production environments may contribute dry eyes.

Am I at risk of Dry Eyes?

Almost everyone suffers from dry eyes at least once or twice due to allergies, low humidity, or windy weather. Dry eyes are more likely to affect people with certain health conditions, such as autoimmune diseases.

Dry eyes may be caused by an underlying health condition such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, or rosacea.

A dry eye disorder occurs when tear production is too little or when tears evaporate too quickly. In either case, there is not enough fluid in the tears. When tears are insufficient, the surface of the eye can become dry. The tears will also become saltier. This leads to inflammation, discomfort and blurred vision.

As a result of chronic dry eye disease, ocular tissues can become damaged and in severe cases, scarring can appear on the cornea, the clear dome of tissue that covers the front part of the eye. When the damage is severe, it can cause blurry vision or even blindness. It is not uncommon for dry eye disease to affect a person’s quality of life significantly. The effect of chronic, mild or moderate dry eye disease on quality of life can be as significant as breaking a hip due to pain and physical limitations, according to one study in the United Kingdom.

How to look after your dry eyes

The optician will probably start your dry eye care with advice to reduce environmental dryness and shake up your daily routine. The first line of care recommendations might include these tips:

  • Avoid air blowing in or across your eyes: Air conditioners and heaters contribute to dry eye disease. Point fans away from your eyes when inside or driving. In windy weather, wear protective eyewear such as sunglasses. Try using an eye mask or humidifier if you have a heater or fan running during the night while you sleep. Ceiling fans are notorious for drying out your eyes!
  • Blink more often or take an eye break: Our blink rate is lower when we read, play a piece of sheet music, look at a computer screen, or use our smartphones. When performing tasks that require more visual concentration, blink more often or close your eyes for a few minutes periodically.
  • Use artificial tears: Lubrication plays an important role in the treatment of dry eye disease. Preservative-free artificial tears are recommended. Essentially, this is due to the fact that preservatives used to stop bacteria from growing over time can damage the surface of the eye, causing further irritation and redness. A wide variety of pharmacies and supermarkets sell artificial tears that are free of preservatives. Infections can be prevented by purchasing individual vials. The key to artificial tear use is preventing the eyes from feeling dry in the first place, not after they begin to feel dry.
  • Try an eye gel or ointment: Longer-lasting lubrication might be provided by these thicker tears. Because the thickness can blur your vision for 15 minutes or more, you might consider putting them in before bed. If you don’t close your eyes completely during sleep, using gel overnight helps protect your eyes.
  • Use a warm compress:  Warm face cloths and eye masks can help clear blocked oil glands. Apply them for five to ten minutes twice a day. It can be relaxing to do this regularly to maintain your eye health.
  • Lid scrubs: It is important to keep the eyelid area clean in order to help keep the glands healthy. Several pharmacies and supermarkets sell lid scrubs that can be used to remove debris. You should scrub your lids every day and use warm compresses to increase oil production and keep your glands healthy. 

Advanced dry eye therapies

If self-care therapies don’t effectively treat your symptoms, your optician or optometrist might suggest more advanced, nonsurgical treatments, such as:

  • Medication adjustment: There are certain drugs that can worsen dry eye symptoms, including antihistamines, antidepressants, birth control pills, and blood pressure medications. Talk to your GP or pharmacist to find an alternative. Be sure to discuss all medications you are taking with your doctor and continue taking them as prescribed until your doctor recommends a change.
  • Prescription eye drops: Prescription eye drops help increase tear production and reduce inflammation in the eyes if the over-the-counter artificial tears aren’t enough. Ask your GP about a prescription for Hylo Forte if you have a persistent problem
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS): The discomfort caused by dry eyes can be relieved with over-the-counter NSAIDs.
  • Steroid eye drops: It is possible to need steroid eye drops for short periods of time when dry eye disease triggers inflammation. Due to potential side effects, these drops should only be used for a short period of time in order to reduce inflammation.

What if none of that works?

For cases of severe dry eyes we can refer to specialists who may recommend one of the following therapies;

  • Specialty contact lenses: The surface of the eye can be protected by certain types of contact lenses. They ensure that the cornea remains hydrated and promote healing. Contact lenses called scleral lenses can be helpful for patients with severe dry eye disease.
  • Eyelid thermal pulsation technology: It may be possible to receive an out-patient procedure if you suffer from meibomian gland dysfunction. A device is placed over the eyelids and heat is applied to soften the hardened oil-like substance. In addition, pulsed pressure is used to open and express the clogged glands. The glands can produce healthy oils once the hardened substance has been removed from the glands, preventing tears from evaporating. This procedure takes about 12 minutes.
  • Intense pulsed light (IPL) therapy: This procedure can be performed as an outpatient procedure for patients with rosacea and meibomian gland dysfunction. The small blood vessels that supply the glands in the eyelids can be treated using a cool laser. Consequently, the inflammation of the eyelids and ocular surface is reduced and healthy lipids that prevent tear evaporation are produced.

In Summary

As the UK’s only specialist Performing Arts eye care provider we understand more than most just how much dry eye conditions can impact a performer’s career and everyday life. 

Our optical specialists understand the demands of professional musicians and performing arts professionals. Working in collaboration with our dispensing opticians and optometrists, we are able to assist musicians. It is surprising how many musicians are unaware of the many solutions available to them. 

With the precision of our performing arts eye exams, the expertise of our optometrists and dispensing opticians using cutting edge diagnostic equipment and dispensing procedures our unique approach can help to resolve performing arts practitioners’ vision problems. To help in the treatment of dry eye we have developed a Dry Eye Treatment Programme. This is a management program consisting of:

  • Initial 30 minute consultation with a dry eye specialist Optometrist, followed by reviews within the first 3 month period as necessary
  • Up to 3 appointments with an Optometrist and/or Dispensing Optician throughout the year
  • Preferential discounts of products to manage your condition
  • All this for just £4.99 per month
  • Treatment may consist of:
  • Ocular lubricants
  • Heat treatment
  • Lid massage
  • Lid hygiene
  • Supplements

If you are suffering from any of the conditions mentioned above or have any of the symptoms described then please speak to one of our staff.  To book an appointment or find out more about our exclusive dry eye programme, Call us today and speak to a member of our team. 

Contact: To find out more about Allegro Optical, the musicians’ opticians go to; https://allegrooptical.co.uk/services/musicians-optical-services/

Categories
News

Wind Musicians and Glaucoma January is Glaucoma Awareness Month at the “Musicians’ Optician”

The month of January is Glaucoma Awareness Month, a time to raise awareness of the leading cause of irreversible blindness. We take Glaucoma very seriously at Allegro Optical since many of our staff members are wind instrumentalists. 

Researchers have recently concluded that musicians who play high-resistance wind instruments may be more inclined to develop glaucoma. This is because blowing into high-resistance wind instruments causes the body to automatically perform a Valsalva manoeuvre in response to certain stimuli. Wind instrumentalists take a breath, but before they begin playing there is a momentary hesitation as their tongues rise up and lock in place, building up air pressure in their mouth.

Focusing on musicians eye pressure

JS Schuman demonstrated in 2000 that playing notes with high resistance and amplitude increases eye pressure significantly. When playing their instruments, high- and low-resistance wind musicians experience a transient increase in intraocular pressure (IOP). Optometrists measure this with the puff of air test. Players with high resistance to wind experience a greater increase in IOP than those with low resistance to wind. 

A small but significantly higher incidence of visual field loss (loss of peripheral vision) was observed among wind musicians who had high resistance.  According to JS Schuman, long-term intermittent elevations in IOP during the playing of high-resistance wind instruments, such as a trumpet, can result in glaucomatous damage that could be misdiagnosed as normal-tension glaucoma.

Soprano and Alto Saxophonists, French Horn players, Soprano Cornet players and Oboists experienced smaller increases in IOP. Once a musician stops blowing into the instrument, the IOP returns to normal. During playing instruments, these players may experience “transient” (in terms of hours) periods of increased eye pressure. Because it has not been studied, no one knows how common glaucoma is among high-resistance wind instrument players. A musician who has more than one risk factor is probably more susceptible to glaucoma. A short-sighted professional trumpet player with a family history of glaucoma, for example, would have an extremely high risk of developing glaucoma.

Who Is Susceptible To Glaucoma?

Glaucoma and its effects should be of concern to everyone. Some people are at greater risk of developing this disease because of certain conditions related to it. Among them are:

  1. Those with a family history of glaucoma.
  2. People of Afro-Caribbean origin are four times more likely to get glaucoma than Caucasians.
  3. Short-sightedness (needing glasses to see at distance) increases the risk of developing primary open-angle glaucoma. Another type of glaucoma, angle-closure glaucoma, is more common in long-sighted individuals (who require glasses for near tasks).
  4. Glaucoma is also more likely to affect people with diabetes, those who have had eye injuries, or those who have had long-term treatment with steroids.

What is Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is not one disease. In reality, it is caused by various diseases that affect the eye. These diseases cause glaucoma by gradually deteriorating the cells of the optic nerve, which transmits visual impulses from the eye to the brain. The nature of glaucoma can be clarified by understanding how the eye works.

An eye is filled with a jelly-like substance referred to as vitreous. In the front of the eye, a small compartment, the anterior chamber, is filled with a watery fluid, the aqueous humor, which not only nourishes the cornea and lens but also provides the necessary pressure to maintain the eye’s shape. Intraocular pressure, or IOP, is the name given to this pressure. 

A gland behind the iris produces aqueous humor, called the ciliary body. After nourishing both the cornea and lens, it drains through a thin, spongy tissue only one-fiftieth of an inch wide, called the trabecular meshwork. As this drain clogs, aqueous humor cannot leave the eye at the speed it is produced. Consequently, the fluid backs up and the pressure in the eye increases.

Damage caused in the eye by increased pressure

The optic nerve can be damaged by glaucoma. Gradually, this nerve deteriorates, causing blind spots in the visual field, particularly in the periphery. Normally, the “cup” in the centre of the optic disc is quite small in comparison with the entire optic disc. When the optic nerve is damaged by glaucoma, the nerve fibres begin to die because of increased pressure in the eye and/or a loss of blood flow. As a result of glaucoma, the optic nerve cup enlarges (and in reality, the optic nerve enlarges as a result). Although the exact reason for this occurrence is unknown, increased eye pressure is likely to be the cause of this nerve damage. 

We all want to enjoy as long a music-making career as possible, we all know making music isn’t just a hobby, it’s a passion and a way of life. So protect your sight reading by looking after your eye health and your vision. If you can’t sight read the music on the stand you won’t be able to play it. 

Protect your vision and extend your playing career by following a few simple tips. Here are some habits that can reduce the risk of glaucoma-related vision loss include:

  • Have regular eye exams, at least once every two years
  • If you have a family history of glaucoma then have an exam every year
  • Consume lots of leafy greens and fruits
  • Regular and moderate exercise is essential
  • Stay healthy by maintaining a healthy weight
  • Consume coffee moderately, or better yet, sip tea instead
  • Avoid smoking

Give your eyes a little TLC during Glaucoma Awareness Month? Call Allegro Optical in Greenfield or Meltham to schedule an appointment! The best way to maintain good eye health is to have regular eye exams at all ages!

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About Allegro Music News

“In conversation” with Cory Band’s Flugelhorn star;  Helen Williams

Allegro Optical talks to Helen WIlliams

“Green Eyewear” for green eyes

“In Conversation” will be a regular interview series, in which one of our team sits down with leading lights from the world of music. From musicians to dancers, public speakers to instrument makers, this series will allow us to chat with some of the creative people we have helped and talk to them in-depth, about their careers, creative processes, and most importantly their vision and eyewear. Allegro Optical, “the musician’s optician” MD Stephen Tighe, talks to Cory Band’s Flugelhorn player and good friend of the musician’s optician, Helen Williams. Cory Band Helen Williams wearing David Green Eyewear

ST – Helen, how have you coped with lock-down?

I’m fortunate to be in lockdown with my best friend, (and husband!), Glyn. So, apart from a few business and financial worries that we’re coping with by being extra savvy at the moment, it has been OK…, well apart from not going to rehearsals and giving concerts. That is what we’re missing almost as much as our families!

ST – We’ve noticed lots of online activity from you, Glyn and the band. How was the interactive experience for you?

We have been craving the performance element of our lives, so having projects to work on with Cory and the individual things we have been doing, has been helping a lot. We’ve tried using the Acapella App… and really enjoyed the process. What a brilliant practice tool it has turned into! Listening back to recordings has helped work on tuning and ensemble. The aspects of playing that we almost do without thinking, whilst in a band rehearsal or performance and something we are missing most. I’ve taught myself several new IT skills involved with recording and editing, using (new to me) software apps, and enjoyed doing it as I’ve had the time on my hands to do it properly!

ST – How have your specialist musicians’ glasses helped? Or Since coming to Allegro, have our lenses helped with your playing and previous eye-sight issues?

To be honest, I really couldn’t do without my glasses from Allegro. I would liken it to having had my failing eyesight, (due to my age), totally corrected. I wear my glasses all the time. Not only can I see my music on my stand as I practice, rehearse, and teach, but also when I’m performing as a soloist. This is when I’m using my left eye more than my right (dominant eye), because of the nature and positioning of my instrument. It’s very important to have this knowledge, as you stand in front of an audience that you are going to be able to see what you’re playing. Then literally, all you have to do is perform! I wear my glasses for driving, watching TV, using the computer…ALL THE TIME.

ST – Would you recommend our in-depth consultation process to other musicians?

The consultation process was key to finding a solution to my very particular difficulties with wearing glasses to read music. There was some trial and error involved, but Sheryl quickly got to grips with what I needed, (and the solutions required to overcome my problems), and found the perfect solution for me. I cannot recommend Allegro highly enough and have done so lots of times!

ST – What’s with the stamp collecting?

This will follow me to my grave now won’t it?!?!? It is literally something I’ve always said just before going on stage in a contest. Just when the apprehension reaches its peak, the moment you are about to step on stage, another less perilous hobby springs to mind. I mentioned it when we were making the SkyArts documentaries in 2018 and they edited just that one comment from me into the titles for each programme. If I had £1 for every time someone has mentioned it to me since…

ST – You chose a handcrafted David Green eyewear frame, what attracted you to these frames?

I like the design of the frame and the ones I chose are a change from my usual glasses. I’m a creature of habit and a bit of a plain Jane normally, always going for the same or similar. My new frames are just a bit different for me. David Green eyewear Cerris - Helen Williams frame

ST: Is the idea of low impact and environmentally friendly eyewear important to you?

Environmentally friendly is not something I had ever really considered before when looking at new eyewear, but what a fabulous idea. I’m delighted that my new frames fall into this category!

ST: Isn’t it a bit of a coincidence that you chose a handcrafted frame by David Green Eyewear considering your childhood nickname?

For many years at school, my nickname was “Green-eye”….not surprisingly because my eyes are greenish, (though I think they’re getting browner as I age!). It’s totally appropriate that my eyewear should be from David Green Eyewear!

ST: You’ve been visiting Allegro Optical, the musician’s optician for some time now, and it’s quite a trek from Wales, why do you feel, as a musician, that specialist eye care is important?

It takes about 4 ½ hours for us to get from South Wales to Allegro Optical, but having an optician who understands and can come up with solutions to some very musician specific problems, is an absolute godsend. Why would I go elsewhere?

Helen WIlliams of Cory Band and Sheryl Doe the musicians optician at the Sage Brass in Concert

ST – Can you see how our in-depth “musician focused” eye-care can prolong a musician’s career?

Being able to see the music is vital to musicians. Losing that ability is frustrating at best and totally disabling at worst. I wouldn’t be able to continue playing for Cory Band without my glasses specifically tailored for me by Allegro. Fact!

Why do musicians come to Allegro Optical?

As an independent family run business, we are gaining an international reputation. Both for professional excellence and an inventive approach to meeting customer needs. Now known internationally as the ‘Musician’s Opticians’ we are attracting many clients from across Europe and further afield. Our groundbreaking work with performers, players and conductors have resulted in Allegro Optical becoming the first and only opticians to gain registration with the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM). We are currently working with Bapam and The Royal College of Music Healthy Performer project. As part of the project, the Royal College of Music has commissioned Twenty-five short films, one of which features Allegro Optical. Although the release of the film has been delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic. The films feature specialist healthcare and medical professionals talking about their area of expertise. As part of the Healthy Conservatoires Network, the films will provide practical advice to help performers recognise symptoms and give preventative advice or discuss treatments available for common conditions. We treat each client as an individual because they are. It is true that no two musicians are the same, so why should their vision correction be? We enjoy creating unique lenses to meet a musician’s particular needs. As musicians ourselves we can ask the right questions and interpret the answers accordingly.

Award-winning eye-care

We’ve been pretty successful in helping performers to #SeeTheMusic. In fact, in the last twelve months alone we have scooped no less than five national and regional awards for our work in this field. These awards include the National ‘Best New Arts & Entertainment Business of the Year at a gala event in London. Managing Director Sheryl Doe was awarded the 2019 Dispensing Optician of the Year and she was a finalist in the AOP Dispensing Optician of the year 2020. She has also reached the finals of the  National Business Women’s Awards, for the Business Owner of the Year category.  Allegro Optical’s cutting edge approach to dispensing and their musical experience has led to the team being shortlisted for the prestigious Opticians Awards, Optical Assistant team of the year 2020 During March 2019, Allegro Optical was awarded the Scale-Up Business of the Year, at the regional finals of the Federation of Small Business awards in York. They then went on to receive the FSB Chairman’s award at the national finals in May. Finally winning the FBU Yorkshire family business of the year. Allegro Optical has been featured in many national publications including The Times, 4BarsRest, The British Bandsman and Music Teacher Magazine. If you are a musician who is struggling with their vision and making music no longer the enjoyable experience it once was, give us a call at either Greenfield on 01457 353100 or Meltham on 01484 907090.
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About Allegro Music News

Outstanding performance from start to finish – A blog by violinist Richard Bottom of Slaithwaite Philharmonic Orchestra

A violinist’s view

We love to receive feedback, good and maybe not so good, it is all helpful and helps us to grow and improve our business and products. We’re even happier when a happy customer offers to write a blog about their experience. In this blog Violinist Richard Bottom from Slaithwaite Philharmonic Orchestra talks all about his journey to find the right glasses to help him see the music.

Violinist Richard Bottom at Huddersfield town hall with Sheryl from ALlegro Optical, the musicians optician

Struggling to see music

I decided to give Allegro Opticians a try after reading their claims and some of the testimonials on their website.

I have been struggling to see music when playing my violin and viola for several years. My normal varifocals just didn’t work when playing. I tried single lens glasses, which were fine for reading the music in front of me, but didn’t work playing in the orchestra. My regular optician suggested bi focals but these made me feel sick.

Things came to a head in July Slaithwaite Philharmonic Orchestra were reading through Beethoven’s Eroica, a symphony which, for some reason I had never played and was really looking forward to doing. I struggled to see the music so much I went home in tears, convinced my playing days in an orchestra were over.

Looking for a solution

The following day I rang Allegro and made an appointment for later that same day. It was clear from the outset that Allegro were different from other opticians and really did understand the quite complex requirements for glasses for musicians.

The initial eye test was thorough, similar to what you would expect from any other examination. 

What followed, however is in my opinion what makes Allegro stand out from the crowd.

Next came a detailed discussion took place with Sheryl Doe, the dispensing optician. Sheryl covered all aspects of what I needed to be able to see. And it didn’t stop there. Violin out, music on stand, distances I needed to be able to see at measured:

  • height of the music on the stand, 
  • how far away the conductor was, 
  • distance to the desk in front (for copying bowings during rehearsal), 
  • writing on my own part. 
  • tracking my eye movement to see which parts of the lens I was using when playing. 

You name it, it was checked and double checked.

 

Seeing is believing

And the attention to detail continued. When the glasses came back from the factory Sheryl wasn’t happy with them. Slight changes were made and the lenses re-made till she was satisfied they would do the job. Even then I was sent home to play and make sure I was completely happy.

The glasses are not cheap, around what you would pay for high end varifocals. But the end result is, I now have a pair of glasses I previously thought it was impossible to make. As a result I can look forward to playing again. Allegro really do understand the needs of musicians and their attention to detail is outstanding.

I have no reservations whatsoever in recommending them to anyone looking for an optician who will go that extra mile to get it right and would like to thank all their staff for their professionalism and help.

Why do musicians come to Allegro Optical?

As an independent family run business we are gaining an international reputation for professional excellence and an inventive approach to meeting customer needs.

Now known internationally as the ‘Musicians Opticians’ we are attracting many clients from across Europe and further a field. Our groundbreaking work with performers, players and conductors has resulted in Allegro Optical becoming the first and only opticians to gain registration with the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM)

We treat each client as an individual because they are. It is true that no two musicians are the same, So why should their vision correction be? We enjoy creating unique lenses to meet a musician’s particular needs. As musicians ourselves we can ask the right questions and interpret the answers accordingly to provide the very best glasses for musicians.

Award-winning eye-care

So successful has Allegro Optical been in helping performers that this year alone we have scooped no less than five national and regional awards. These awards include the National ‘Best New Arts & Entertainment Business of the Year‘ at a gala event in London. Managing Director Sheryl Doe was awarded the 2019 ‘Dispensing Optician of the Year‘ and she has been shortlisted for the AOP Dispensing Optician of the year 2020.

During March Allegro Optical was awarded the ‘Scale-Up Business of the Year‘ at the regional finals of the Federation of Small Business awards in York and went on to receive the FSB Chairman’s award at the national finals in May. Finally winning the FBU Yorkshire family business of the year. Allegro Optical’s unique optical solution and our cutting edge approach to dispensing has led to the group being named finalists in the Huddersfield Examiners Business Awards in the Innovation and Enterprise category.

Allegro Optical the musicians optician Sheryl winning Dispensing Optician of the Year 2019 Award for their work with Musicians eye care

The company has been featured in many national publications including The Times 4BarsRest, The British Bandsman and Music Teacher Magazine.

Are you are a musician who is struggling with their vision? Is making music is no longer the enjoyable experience it once was? Are you looking for the perfect pair of glasses for musicians? If so call us at either Greenfield on 01457 353100 or Meltham on 01484 907090.

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About Allegro News

Tony was getting “Brassed Off” when he couldn’t see the music

The inability to see the music left trombonist “brassed off”

If ever we discover the meaning of life, we’re fairly certain that in our case it will involve music. So just imagine if music has always been a big part of your life. How you would feel if that gift were threatened. Tony Spencer of Simply Brass was facing that very situation when he came across Allegro Optical, “the musicians’ optician” at Brass in Concert at the Sage in Gateshead. Coincidentally Tony was a former player of many years with Kippax band, who recently won the Yorkshire Regional Brass Band Finals and are conducted by none other than Allegro Opticals Managing Director Stephen Tighe.  

Trombonist Tony Spencer of Simply Brass buys his glasses from Allegro Optical the musicians optician in Saddleworth and Holmfirth

Trombonist Tony Spencer of Simply Brass buys his glasses from Allegro Optical the musicians optician in Saddleworth and Holmfirth

Tony is a trombonist and co-founder of Scarborough based community band “Simply Brass”. He decided to travel to Meltham with his trombone a full consultation as he was struggling. To say that Tony presented us with a bit of a challenge is a bit of an understatement. But it has been a very rewarding experience for us as we have pushed the boundaries as a result.

Tony has a few eye disorders including early cataracts.  He also has an epiretinal membrane (ERM), a condition resulting in a very thin layer of scar tissue.  This has formed on the surface of the retina.

In addition to this, Tony has presbyopia and a very dominant left eye. Another issue is that while Tony’s left eye is his dominant eye it is also amblyopic, or “lazy”. Some studies have shown that saccadic latency is increased in cases of dominant amblyopic eyes.  Making seeing the music increasingly difficult, often resulting in double vision. So it is no surprise that Tony was having problems.

Finding the perfect solution

After a thorough consultation with our senior optometrist Claire Wightman, she decided to blur Tony’s left dominant eye.  It was causing more problems with his vision than it was solving. By Suppressing his vision in the amblyopic eye Claire was able to eliminate the symptoms of double vision. This improved his convergence and gave him a clear view of the music and the conductor.

Initially, we dispensed Tony with one of our Fogoto lenses to the right eye.  To give him the widest possible field of view, but this compromised his vertical field. This can be a problem for Trombonists as the weight of the instrument can cause the musician to pitch forward. Thereby raising the pupil position in the lens, altering the vertical field. Because of this, we changed the design of the right lens to a digitised freeform single vision lens with a small power reduction in the top allowing Tony to see the conductor. For the left, we used a balance single vision aspheric lens with a higher plus power.

Tony opted for photochromic lenses to help when playing outdoor summer concerts.  An anti-reflection coating to help with the glare caused by cataracts and an oleophobic coating for easy cleaning.  The job turned out to be a bit of a challenge for the lab as matching the photochromic layers. Reducing the magnification effect of the left lens proved difficult too, but by using different indices they got there in the end.

Freeform lens generation

Today’s new freeform generators are now so accurate they allow us to generate a nearly infinite number of lens surfaces with extreme precision and all in the UK. Tony opted for a fabulous British designed acetate frame from Hook LDN which gave him a good field of view with maximum style.

Trombonist Tony Spencer of Simply Brass buys his glasses from Allegro Optical the musicians optician in Saddleworth and HolmfirthTrombonist Tony Spencer of Simply Brass buys his glasses from Allegro Optical the musicians optician in Saddleworth and Holmfirth

When Tony collected his new glasses he was able to see the music on the stand clearly. He was also able to focus on the conductor. We contacted Tony a few days later to see how he was getting on with his new glasses. He said;This innovative approach by Sheryl and her colleagues at Allegro Optical has hopefully increased my time in banding.

On a recent visit, Tony even gave us a demonstration of his sight reading with his new glasses.

Why do musicians come to Allegro Optical?

We are an independent family run business gaining an international reputation for our professional excellence, as well as our inventive approach to meeting customer needs.

Known internationally as the ‘Musicians Opticians’ for our groundbreaking work with performers, players and conductors have resulted in us becoming the first and only opticians to gain registration with the British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM).  

We don’t hold with the idea that giving a musician a pair of occupational lenses, bifocals or degressive readers will solve all their problems. We treat each client as an individual because they are all individuals. Creating unique lenses to meet a musician’s particular needs is a challenge we like to embrace. As musicians ourselves we can ask the right questions and interpret the answers accordingly.

Award-winning eye-care

In fact so successful have we been in helping performers that during March we scooped the National ‘Best New Arts & Entertainment Business of the Year‘ at a gala event in London. As March drew to a close Managing Director Sheryl Doe becoming the 2019 ‘Dispensing Optician of the Year‘. Also during March Allegro Optical was awarded the  ‘Scale-Up Business of the Year‘ at the regional finals of the Federation of Small Business awards in York and went on to receive the FSB Chairmans award at the national finals in May. 

If you are a musician who is struggling with their vision and making music is no longer the enjoyable experience it once was. Call us at either Greenfield on 01457 353100 or Meltham on 01484 907090.

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News

When A Medical Condition Threatens A Musicians’ Passion

What can you do when your whole career is threatened by a medical condition?

When a musician suffers a medically threatening condition, no one realises what it means to potentially lose that vital part of your life your passion, your very being. ClassicFM has a heart moving blog all about one musicians’ battle with a painful neuromuscular condition which disrupted her career as a musician. Cor anglais player Davida Scheffers gave an emotional performance of ‘Schindler’s List’.  Despite her fear that she might never be able to play with a professional orchestra again, Davida’s dream was to play with the Netherlands Symphony Orchestra. Last year, she managed it, read more at http://www.classicfm.com/music-news/videos/soloist-cries-in-schindlers-list/

Presbyopia and the musician

While we accept that ageing vision, or Presbyopia as it is known, is nowhere near as serious a condition it can threaten many musicians careers. Presbyopia is a form of progressive long-sightedness caused by the loss of elasticity of the lens of the eye, occurring typically in middle and old age. Very few of us will escape presbyopia, even if you have never had a vision problem before. Even people who are short-sighted will notice that their near vision blurs when they wear their usual spectacles or contact lenses to correct their distance vision. This can be problematic for a musician who will find their vision at the music stand distance severely compromised. Up until now, there have been no completely satisfactory solutions available to the musician. Some Opticians prescribe varifocals, however, the area of the lens for music stand is much to narrow. Even in the new freeform digital lenses, it’s a real compromise, forget sharing a stand! Some Opticians will suggest Computer or Office lenses, however, if you play in an orchestra you won’t be able to see your conductor clearly.

At Allegro Optical Opticians we specialise in helping presbyopic and older musicians to see the music.

As musicians ourselves we understand the many visual requirements placed on musicians. As a result, we have developed a selection of lenses designed and dispensed specifically to suit individual musicians needs. Creating a solution especially for the client, providing a perfect optical solution. We understand the variety of dispensing challenges that practitioners may face when a musician presents in practice, but as musicians ourselves we are able to meet their individual needs perfectly. If you are a musician who has problems seeing the music give us a call at Allegro Optical Opticians on 01484 907090 for advice or to book a consultation.
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About Allegro

Optician’s looking back on a fantastic first year. Thank you Meltham

It’s our birthday on Sunday so we’re looking back on a fantastic first year in Meltham for our opticians practice

A year on and so much has happened. We now have a busy vibrant practice and as many of you will know we’re finalists for the national Optician Awards.

This time last year we said “We’re all ready for our big opening on Saturday. It’s been a heck of a journey and thank you to everyone who has helped”.

In the space of a year, we have achieved so much. Amazingly we’ve received a magnificent 45 testimonials/Thank you letters and cards.  We’ve been shortlisted for 3 awards and so far we’ve won one, which is the Eaton Smith Business of the month award, this puts us in with a chance to win their very prestigious Business of the year award in July.

Allegro Optical Opticians in Meltham finalists in the FSB Awards

ALLEGRO OPTICAL IN MELTHAM are optician_awards_finalist_image

Allegro Optical are winners of the Eaton Smith BOTM

Sheryl and Steve attended an awards presentation and were delighted with their certificate and bag of goodies.

Receiving the Eaton Smith Business of the Month award

A year of growth

Just twelve months ago we opened to the sound of a brass band and we gathered quite a crowd.

Diggle B play outside Allegro Optical Opticians in Meltham

Opening Day inside at Allegro Optical Opticians in MelthamOpening Day with a crowd outside Allegro Optical Opticians in Meltham

We started off with just three staff members, Josie Dawson, Sheryl Doe and Stephen Haigh, but now we have grown to ten, and what a fabulous bunch of people they are. Optometrist Sara Ackroyd joined the team in September and Optometrist Claire Wightman Joined us in October, we also now have dispensing Optician Abigayle Doe, e-commerce manager Xanthe Doe. Bubbly Jill Barrowclough joined us in July and Sean joined the team in August. Now Stephen Tighe is recovering from his life-threatening illness, he is back to work one or two days a week, and we are so pleased to have him back.

Allegro Opticians Christmas do in Meltham

We have been the subject of ten newspaper articles, all of them good. We have had a balloon reach Austria, and forged new friendships in Europe as a result.

Allegro Optical Opticians in the Yorkshire post Allegro Optical Opticians for Award winning eyecare article in examinerAllegro Optical Musicians Opticians

A real local optician

We have supported so many charities and raised money for all of them, we’ve joined the Holme Valley Lions to help local community groups.

Allegro Optical, Sheryl with the Lions at MorrisonsAllegro Optical Opticians are the co founders of Meltham Business Association

We have joined the Meltham Scarecrow Festival committee and we’re working hard to give Meltham it’s best Scarecrow Festival yet. Allegro Optical is also a founding member of Meltham Business Association, always working for the village we love. Meltham!

In the last twelve months, a pair of Bananas has visited the practice to take tea, thanks to our friends at Holme Valley Fairtrade Association.

Bananas take tea at Allegro Optical Opticians in Meltham with Holme Valley Fairtrade Association

We’ve been on the radio

Allegro Optical on Penistonefm radio

and television

Allegro Optical Opticians on Kirklees TV with Niamh and Liz Hey

Sheryl Doe on Business Daily

 

See the music

We have helped so many musicians see the music, it’s been a real privilege to help so many talented people. With musicians from so many different genres beating a path to our door, we have clients from all over the UK and Europe.

Markus Van Horn buys his glasses at Allegro Optical OpticiansMichele Hickie - Bassoonist at Allegro Optical The Musicians Optician

But best of all, we have meet hundreds of lovely new customers. Many of whom are now firm friends.

So for award-winning eyecare you can trust, Allegro Optical is a must. Follow the crowd for professional and affordable eyecare to Allegro Optical Opticians in Meltham.  Call01484 907090 to book your appointment.

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News

Markus was wearing his troubled face when he was playing his Double Bass

Markus Van Horn is a very busy professional Double Bassist, specialising in Baroque, classical, and contemporary music. Markus plays with ensembles including the, City of London Sinfonia, London Sinfonietta, Orchestra of St John’s, London Mozart Players, Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, English National Opera, English National Ballet, Birmingham Royal Ballet, Britten Sinfonia, Opera 80, London City Ballet, Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment. He has also played in principal roles with Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, Scottish Chamber Orchestra and Opera North.

 

A full-time varifocal wearer, Markus began experiencing problems focusing at music stand distance. He mentioned this to his local optician when he went for his regular eye examination. His opticians prescribed an additional pair of single vision spectacles for music stand distance. A musician not only needs to see the music stand. He also needs to see the conductor clearly and his fellow performers. Markus contacted Allegro Optical Opticians, as the spectacles prescribed failed to provide him with clear vision at all the working distances he needed during his work.

Allegro came to the rescue

The team invited Markus up to Meltham in Holmfirth for a consultation. Then plotted a performers lens designed to take into account all his working distances. We also measured and plotted the area and angle of his visual field at each distance. Once that was complete we adapted the music stand distance to give Markus as wide a field at the stand distance to enable him to see two full pages of sheet music, thus making it easier for him to concentrate on playing rather than seeing. As Markus lives in London we posted his new glasses to him a couple of weeks later, Just before Christmas.

Double Bassist Markus Van Horn buys his Spectacles from Allegro Optical the musicians optician

Markus took a few weeks for his eyes to fully adjust to the new lenses. Learning exactly where each area is and developing his muscle memory. Markus now says  “The new lenses have really helped make the music clearer on the page and are of immense benefit when the lighting is poor. I am very pleased with them

Conclusion

Musicians can present an optometrist or dispensing optician with a great many challenges. Mainly because of their working distances and the varying positions of their visual field. As musicians ourselves, we’re able to ask the musicians the right questions, and to interpret their answers. Using our combined optical and musical skills we are able to address and resolve the many visual problems encountered by older musicians.

As a specialist optician, our team at Allegro Optical are able to produce individual solutions to suit many musician’s needs. This service is not available anywhere else. We approach the problem in a completely different way, looking at it from the musician’s perspective. Our unique design of lenses which will solve their individual unique problems. We have built up a considerable following among musicians and performers as a result.

It’s been less than twelve months since we opened our brand new practice in Meltham and we’re already getting noticed. Not only has the Allegro Optical Opticians been shortlisted for the Yorkshire and Humberside Federation of Small Businesses, Celebrating Small Business Awards, for the Start-up Business of the Year category. Our Co-founder and Dispensing Optician Sheryl Doe has also been named as a finalist in this year’s Optician Awards, Dispensing Optician of the year award.

At Allegro Optical we are passionate about helping to correct the specific visual problems faced by musicians and performers. Providing a range of tailor-made solutions and services including on-site vision assessments. Using specialist optical technology for those affected by reduced visual clarity. The team have built up a broad client base, from professional classical musicians to members of well-known brass bands and many keen amateurs. We have also helped music teachers, performers, TV presenters and many keen amateur musicians of all genres. We love helping musicians to see their music again and extending their playing careers.