Trombonist Keeps His Position!

When Adrian’s vision began to slide

Championship Bass Trombonist Adrian Bird has reached a certain age. It’s as certain as death and taxes and it comes to us all in time. But it can be devastating for musicians. Adrian has significant astigmatism and has worn glasses for most of his life. It wasn’t until he developed presbyopia that his eyesight really began to interfere with is music making. Presbyopia is a condition which affects our eye’s ability to focus at close working distances. It is caused by the reduction in the elasticity of the eye’s crystalline lenses. Presbyopia can mean that for many musicians like Adrian, focusing on a music stand while also being able to see the conductor can be tricky. An accomplished musician, Adrian has quite a sound, certainly one worthy of his seat in a championship section band. Adrian joined Leyland Band in March 2017 having previously played for Marsden Band, Wingates Band, Diggle Band and Carlton Main Frickley Colliery Band. He studied music at both Huddersfield and Salford University. Making music is something that Adrian loves and it is part of who he is. So you can imagine how despondent he feels when seeing the music interferes with his playing.

A Busy Man

When not playing Bass Trombone with Leyland Band Adrian runs a successful recruitment agency, The Apprentice Finder, based in Brighouse. Like many entrepreneurs, he spends a fair amount of time using a computer, although he was now finding this easier to do without his spectacles. But it was the music stand which was causing him problems as it was neither in focus with his glasses on or off. Adrian, who lives in Marsden visited Allegro Optical Opticians and carried out a full sight test and eye examination. Following the consultation, we settled on a progressive design lens to allow Adrian to drive, use a computer, play the trombone and read all in one pair of glasses. Adrian also opted for a photochromic coating which has proved particularly useful when playing with the band outside.

A Clear Conclusion

Allegro Optical caught up with Adrian at the British Open Brass Band Championship at Symphony Hall in Birmingham, where Leyland Band were competing in the event. Leyland finished in a very respectable 6th place having been drawn last (19th) to play. We took the opportunity to ask Adrian how he was getting along with his new spectacles. He said “The challenge as I get older is having the ability to be able to read the music and see the conductor clearly. The spectacles from Allegro Opticians allow me to do that so I can concentrate on music-making.” Musicians often present an Optometrist or Dispensing optician with many challenges regarding working and visual field. Here at Allegro Optical Opticians, as musicians ourselves, we are able to ask the right questions and interpret the answer. By using our optical and musical skills and knowledge we are able to address and resolve the many visual problems older musicians encounter. As a specialist Optician Allegro Optical can produce individual solutions to suit a musician’s needs, which are not available elsewhere. At Allegro Optical we approach the problem from the musician’s perspective. We have built up a considerable following as a result. We are very passionate about helping to correct the specific visual needs of musicians and performers. With an extensive range of corrective lenses, we provide a wide range of tailor-made solutions and services. Including advice on optical corrections, on-site vision assessments, and specialist optical technology for those affected by reduced visual clarity. We have a wide-ranging client base, from professional classical musicians to members of well-known brass bands and many keen amateurs. Thanks to our unique solutions we have helped music teachers, performers, TV presenters and many keen amateur musicians of all genres.

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